Archive for September, 2009

Die-cutting-The Basics and a Job

September 30, 2009

Die-cutting is a large part of most commercial printing companies business. And Wintry Press is no exception. We die-cut simple pocket folders, and complex custom shaped pocket folders. We die-cut the front covers of booklets, and die-cut pockets for the inside back covers of magazines. Business card slits, CD slots, gluing pockets 2 sides or 1 side are all pretty standard. 1 job Wintry produced with a die-cut component stands out, at least for this moment. 

Wintry produced a very interestingly designed invitation (actually quite a few, but I’ll talk about just one), with a large animal as the lead character on the front cover of the invite. The eye of the animal was die-cut (3/8″ circle) to reveal the eye of the animal on the inside-very effective (eye catching?)-sorry.

Harold Chayefsky
www.wintrypress.com
212-255-0800/718-392-1020

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Letterpress-the job

September 29, 2009

We (Wintry) have finished the letterpress job I referred to in the September 28th posting. The job finished just fine. The envelopes were not printed letterpress. The client was a bit concerned about the impression showing through to the front or the back of the envelope-we printed 2 envelopes-one printed on the face/front & the other printed on the flap. The job printed in 2 PMS colors, and matching the colors was not a hard task. The usual fiddling up & down to get the density looking good. The trickier part was getting the impression correct, or at the desired level. Many people want to see that impression of the letterpress image deep in the paper. But, with this job, the desire was to not have an impression so heavy that it could be seen on the other side of the paper. The job printed 2 sides, and having the impression interfere with the type would not have been nice. We (Wintry & the client) therefore wanted to have the job still look like it was printed by the letterpress process, but not done so heavy handedly that the impression banged through to the other side. This was accomplished by using very heavy (thick) paper, and also by changing the packing under the plate a few times to get the desired results. With the heavy paper & the letterpress image, the job is beautiful, and different.

Harold Chayefsky
www.wintrypress.com
212-255-0800/718-392-1020

Letterpress

September 28, 2009

Wintry Press prints letterpress. We started a few years back, and it has gained momentum over those years. Letterpress printing has been used for quite a while now by designers, for everything from invitations to business cards and full identity packages. Printing logos & artwork (and the art can be quite intricate), to type, both large & small is easily accomplished with the oldest (almost) of printing methods. The variety of papers that can be used with letterpress gets expanded on the heavier uncoated cover stocks-160# to 200# is not a problem. But, these heavy stocks could not be put through an offset press. Textures work well for letterpress, whether it be vellum, felt, linen, etc. Of course, any color can be matched, just like offset, but with the impression that letterpress makes in the paper, there is a depth that can be gained over offset. Wintry is working on a letterpress project now, and I will write about the production & finished results when the job is complete.

Harold Chayefsky
www.wintrypress.com 
212-255-0800/718-392-1020

Finishing Methods-2nd Entry

September 25, 2009

To continue a bit on the finishing methods-1st entry from earlier, we can briefly discuss a few more ways to bind/finish a printed job. 

A nice way to put a book together, or just pages together is to wire-o bind the book. Or, some sort of spiral, whether it’s metal or plastic. Again, the possibilities are not endless, but there are a lot of choices. The wire for spiral binding can be the usual black or silver. But many colors exist, form white, green, red, blue, bronze, etc. Since wire-o or spiral will allow the pages to lie flat, this can be very helpful with books that need to viewed by a group of people. Wintry has produced quite a few presentation booklets for architects over the years using wire-o to bind. A very thick book can be bound using wire-o or spiral. The results very nice.

Another possibility for binding a book is to put grommets or eyelets through the face of the book close to the binding edge. I talked about this on a specific job in the “interesting job” entry of 9/22/09. Just as a note-eyelets have the hole through them, grommets do not. The usual choice is eyelets. They come standard in many colors, but can also be obtained with a color of the designers choice-basically painted to match. They come in different sizes-width, depth. However, you probably do not want to bind a very thick book with eyelets. Besides the limitation of size, they can move a bit if not tight enough, and the more pages, the easier it moves. This method is a bit different than what is usually seen, but the end product will also be different from what you usually see. Sometimes a good thing

Harold Chayefsky
www.wintrypress.com
212-255-0800/718-392-1020

Finishing Methods-1st entry

September 25, 2009

There are so many ways to finish a printed job-the processes seem very limited at times, but the reality is that even the most common binding methods have many possibilities. Wintry Press has worked with some very creative designers who have challenged the possibilities of each. 

If we start with saddle stitching, and/or staple binding-about as basic as it gets, other than folding-we can immediately think of a few things. First is to put 2 staples on the spine of the booklet. But, we can also use colored staples, and we can also staple on the face of the book-along the side. We can use a stay stitch to hold another printed piece in the book, and then stitch the book. We can use larger, more industrial like staples on the side to give a look of more solidity. The possibilities/options can be very interesting, and go on from there.

With perfect binding-and I’ll use that term for any book or booklet bound with glue on the spine-is actually a bit more limited, I believe, and more expensive, for sure. However, there is conventional perfect binding, notch binding (a bit stronger), lay flat, and simple glue binding. The glue binding on the spine is usually the product of a web press, but does not have to be. Depends on results desired. Small page counts will not give you a square spine. Wintry recently finished a project where we perfect bound an oblong book, and the put 2 large galvanized metal staples on the face of the book, approximately 1/4″ from the binding edge.

Harold Chayefsky
www.wintrypress.com
212-255-0800/718-392-1020

A Bit About Large Format Printing

September 24, 2009

Large format printing can be digital or conventional. When digital the size of the printed piece can vary widely-from 1 foot wide to 10 feet wide by just as many, or more, feet long. because the paper is on a roll, the length of the finished piece can be almost anything. With conventional printing the size of the piece is going to be limited by the size of the press, and by the size the paper is available. With more generic papers, such as coated or offset/opaque uncoated sheets, the availability will be there to fit the large format sheet fed presses. But, when you start to get into the higher end coated sheets and uncoated sheets (i.e. McCoy for coated or Superfine for uncoated) there will be limitations. With small quantities the large sheets simply may not be available. Custom ordered or not. With larger quantities (1,000’s of pounds of paper), the mills may make a large size to fit your needs. By the way, these large sheet fed presses get big. From 38″ x 50″ on the smaller side, to about 68″ x 81″ on the large side. There are others, but that covers the most common range. The print quality on the digital machines can be very nice, of course always depending on the original art and pre-press work. On the newer large sheet presses, the quality can be just as high as a more conventional 40″ press. More on large format at another time. Not the biggest market for Wintry, but it exists and it can be interesting.

Harold Chayefsky
www.wintrypress.com
212-255-0800/718-392-1020

More on uncoated paper printing

September 23, 2009

In the September 16 Wintry Press blog posting, we talked about uncoated papers, and their beauty and print qualities. I would like to discuss just a little more about uncoated paper printing in direct reference to a job Wintry printed for a high end fashion company. The client wanted a “water color” like paper. Meaning very thick, very rough, but soft, vellum service, with the look & feel of being absorbent. Of course, with printing papers too much absorption is a problem for ink holdout. So, this paper had to be very printable, but have those qualities. Wintry, along with the client found a stock that suited the purpose-sorry, it is no longer made, but there are other options. The trick here was to reproduce a fine 4 color image, along with the skin tone of the models, on this paper with as little perceived gain as possible. It was actually easier than it seems. Along with adjusting the plate curves for uncoated paper, we adjusted for dot gain about 3-4 times as much as usual. This resulted in a proof that was quite light, but when ink went to paper it hit the desired image perfectly. It resulted in rich colors, along with detail that could not be seen on the proof-interesting, a bit scary, but it worked. In any case, the point is, that with a little creativity, good pre-press work, experience & communication, the desired results can be obtained under what might not be considered by all to be perfect printing materials & conditions. Just try it!

Harold Chayefsky
www.wintrypress.com
212-255-0800/718-392-1020

Interesting Job-

September 22, 2009

Wintry Press recently produced a job with about 48 page plus a 4 page wraparound cover. The text pages were straight forward 4 color printing with a spot gloss varnish to enhance the photos. All printed on the beautiful high end McCoy Silk 100# text. The interesting (and challenging) part of the job was the cover. We mounted binders cloth in a dark gray to very heavy uncoated cover stock, then foil stamped the logo & our clients company information on the fabric/linen with incredible results. The designer did a magnificent job conceiving & designing this piece, along with working with Wintry to push the envelope to great results. The catalog was bound (on the short dimension) with silver eyelets, and the fabric/linen cover covering the inside text pages on the binding edge. This finished off a the job with interest & some edge, but with the choice of material colors, etc., kept the professional business conservatism needed by this organization.

Harold Chayefsky
www.wintrypress.com
212-255-0800/718-392-1020

Sending Files

September 21, 2009

This may be basic to many, but if nothing else, it will let you know how files can be sent to Wintry Press. Which, by the way, is via any of the preferred methods. 

Files can be simply e-mailed if they are simple-if a file is very big, or complicated, it may not be a good idea, or possible to e-mail

Files can be sent to the Wintry Press ftp site. A dedicated site, set up to receive files of any size. Access to the ftp site can be obtained from the printer (Wintry)

Files can always be picked up via messenger-the hand to hand method-low tech, but it works really well, unless of course the client is in Chicago, and the printer in NY

One final piece of info with the e-mail & ftp-a comprehensive mock up of the job is great for the printer to have-showing pages, back up, and position of all art-finding a way, under any circumstances to get that to the printer along with the art is very helpful

Harold Chayefsky
http://www.wintrypress.com
212-255-0800

Printing 101 & 201-Part New

September 18, 2009

We at Wintry Press have discussed in the previous blogs, digital printing & some of its appropriateness in some situations. We have discussed uncoated papers, and some of its properties under certain conditions. There is so much more to talk about with digital printing & uncoated papers, but a little talk of coated papers would be good now. 

Gloss coated-Sort of speaks for itself, but will be closest in look to many of the conventional proofing systems which are gloss themselves. Gloss stock, along with the gloss inks used, and a gloss varnish or aqueous coating will deliver a very high gloss piece. Can be beautifully flashy & eye catching. Gloss paper can also be used with a satin aqueous coating (between gloss & matte), to “knock down” the gloss of the paper a bit. The design and designers will determine what look works best.

Dull, Silk coated-Also, like the gloss stocks, these papers have good coatings with high ink holdout. The same ideas can be used as with gloss. Put a satin finish on the silk or dull stock, and you come out with a beautiful finish, that is neither glossy or matte.

Matte coated-The surfaces can be very flat, but still have a very good coating. Some matte sheets however, have less coating, and can get a little to close to uncoated papers, so the lower end matte stocks should be chosen carefully. Put a gloss, satin, or matte finish on top and you can end up with a very elegant printed product.

As always, good design mixed with well chosen paper, and clean printing will produce desired results.

Wintry Press & its team will consult & help in any way to reach your desired result on projects.

Harold Chayefsky
http://www.wintrypress.com
212-255-0800