Archive for March, 2010

Wintry Press Ltd. Custom Envelope

March 22, 2010

When we were asked to produce an envelope with solid ink on the flap only, we along with every one else took a quick step backwards. This required, for starters, the envelope to be printed and then converted. This is not usually the most efficient method of producing printed envelopes when the print run is short. However, in this case, we had no choice. Printing the envelope was not a problem. The printing was straight forward, with one color on the flap and on the face of the envelope. At Wintry Press Ltd., we pride ourselves in our service to our clients needs. The need here was to produce an envelope in a small quantity at a reasonable price, and most importantly, with the converting process producing no, or minimal bounce. Because the color on the flap came right to the top, there really was no room for error. Any significant movement (and that means even 1/16″) would create a color line at the top of the face of the envelope, or a white line at the top on the flap-both unacceptable. Doing the converting with any of the “envelope houses” or the “envelope converters” was not a great option. They simply could not hold the register, and would bounce by at least an 1/8″. The next possibility was to print in a very controlled way-small paper, good press-and then die-cut the envelope, and put a precise score at the flap fold. This worked beautifully. It took a lot of work, watching and caring, and close collaboration with a smart designer, but it worked. I don’t know why, but Wintry Press doesn’t say it can’t be done.

Harold Chayefsky
http://www.wintrypress.com
212-255-0800/718-392-1020

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Wintry Press Posters

March 19, 2010

What amazes me these days (it shouldn’t, it’s been happening for a while), is the speed that the new presses can hang plates, get register, achieve and hold color. Though the basic technology of offset printing has not changed much for years-you know, all and water don’t mix-what has changed is the refinement of settings, and of course, the connection now between pre-press and press. This allows all the information from pre-press to be transferred to the press. When the press person gets the plates to hang (automatic plate hangers), color and register are pretty close. I say all this preliminarily to the actual subject title of this entry. The 3 posters Wintry printed recently, each had different images, and therefore different sets of plates and new makereadies for each. We had our client on press. We started the first poster at around 8:30 AM. By 10: 30 we were finished with any color maneuvering we needed to do on the third poster, and by 10:45 or so, the job was finished and we were off to the next job. True, they were short runs, but with everything connected, and automated, hanging plates, getting register and color set, took about 30 minutes. I know it’s fairly common these days (speed, speed, speed), but I’m still amazed.

Harold Chayefsky
www.wintrypress.com
212-255-0800/718-392-1020